Four days after Haiyan swept through the Philippines-the most affected ares were two islands: Leyte and Samar.


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November 12, 2013
Four days after Haiyan swept through the Philippines, the extent of damage is emerging bit by bit. Some describe the situation as being a real catastrophe. And it really is, as despair is increasing among the starving survivors, who are forced to resort to looting.
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Typhoon Haiyan is believed to have caused the death of more than 10,000 people, after devastated entire communities. We remind that the most affected ares were two islands: Leyte and Samar.

Rescuers are trying to carry out tents, food and medical supplies to Tacloban, Leyte island’s capital and the coastal city of 220,000 inhabitants, which is currently a field covered with debris and decomposing bodies. However, emergency teams move slowly because of hard weather conditions, but also looting and hungry residents deprived of drinking water and electricity. Grocery supermarkets and a Red Cross convoy have been attacked.

This chaotic situations reveals the fact that the local government has learned nothing from previous experiences, according to Benito Lim, a political science professor at the Ateneo de Manila University:

State-of-National-Calamity-Declared-in-Ravaged-Philippines

Typhoon Haiyan left only chaos and devastation in their path.

The Filipino authorities have declared a state of national calamity, after the country was hit by one of the strongest typhoons ever recorded. The huge powerful waves brought by Typhoon Haiyan left only chaos and devastation in their path.

Four days after Haiyan swept through the Philippines, the extent of damage is emerging bit by bit. Some describe the situation as being a real catastrophe. And it really is, as despair is increasing among the starving survivors, who are forced to resort to looting.

Typhoon Haiyan is believed to have caused the death of more than 10,000 people, after devastated entire communities. We remind that the most affected ares were two islands: Leyte and Samar.

Rescuers are trying to carry out tents, food and medical supplies to Tacloban, Leyte island’s capital and the coastal city of 220,000 inhabitants, which is currently a field covered with debris and decomposing bodies. However, emergency teams move slowly because of hard weather conditions, but also looting and hungry residents deprived of drinking water and electricity. Grocery supermarkets and a Red Cross convoy have been attacked.

This chaotic situations reveals the fact that the local government has learned nothing from previous experiences, according to Benito Lim, a political science professor at the Ateneo de Manila University:

    The government should mobilize the police and military or train people to clear the roads so food and water can reach the victim.

Near the devastated airport in Tacloban, one can see a huge queue of survivors, who have been traveling for miles through the rain to get there, where they hope to find food and water.
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the U.S. General Paul Kennedy stated after arriving Monday on the island of Leyte. Kennedy took there nearly 90 marines and two C-130 planes loaded with supplies and other materials and devices to help rescue teams reach the isolated areas.

Moreover, the Pentagon also ordered the aircraft carrier George Washington and other American ships, such as two cruisers and a destroyer, all equipped with helicopters, to proceed to the Philippines to help local authorities. The aircraft carrier carried 5,000 soldiers. Another 90 U.S. troops have left Monday at Futenma Marine base on the island of Okinawa (Japan), from where they went to the affected areas.

In turn, Britain will also send a destroyer and a military transport plane to help with the rescue operations, the British Prime Minister David Cameron announced on Monday.

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